The 3-Minute Thesis Challenge

Communicating research findings to diverse audiences is essential not only to convey the impact of science to the general public and promote research funding, but also to inspire children and inform young students about career paths in science. That’s why being a good communicator is a skill that each of us, from grad student to professor, should seek to master. However, explaining the aim of a research project to a non-specialized audience can be a tricky task. Science needs to be made understandable without being oversimplified while avoiding technical jargon.

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Improve your elevator pitch with improvisation

Last month SPEaC held the first of our new quarterly series of workshops: “Improvisation for Scientists.” The goal of the workshop series is to help graduate students and postdocs improve their communication skills through improv-style games and activities. Improv can help make trainees more effective science communicators through emphasizing the importance of listening and engaging with their audience. Continue reading

Understanding Cancer Immunotherapy

The Immune system

Our Immune system comprises different cell types, which are programmed to identify and destroy foreign cells. There are three main categories of cells in our immune system: (1) Lymphocytes comprising the T and B cells, (2) Antigen-presenting cells: macrophages and dendritic cells (3) Granulocytes: neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils. The immune response generated by these cell types can be classified in to two types: the innate immune response and adaptive immune response. Continue reading

Know Thy Researcher

Conceiving an idea, pursuing its experimental validation, publication, ground trial and finally making it available to human kind takes a lot of paid and generous contributions of researchers. Individual efforts form the basis of any transformative scientific development and become crucial in the evolution of any field of study. It is therefore important to recognize researchers and their contributions. Approximately 1.5 million research papers were published in journals in 2010 alone. At an average of 3 authors per paper, excluding multiple papers per author, the lowest estimate of the number of unique researchers listed would be about 4.5 to 5 million per year. How does one recognize each author and their work? It is a cumbersome job for other researchers, employers and stakeholders to identify each researcher based on some of the current literature citation protocols and formats. Continue reading

The Hills are Alive with the Sound of…Science

Children’s angelic voices were accompanied by science experiments on February 28 at the Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center. The Children’s Chorus of Greater Dallas (CCGD) “Earth, Wind & Sky” concert drew inspiration from science themes, including astronomy and biology. CCGD invited SPEaC to perform experiments and answer “Ask a Scientist” questions live onstage during the concert interludes. SPEaC was honored to be in the midst of spectacular artistry, from both the fabulous young singers to the talented CCGD staff that designed, coordinated and conducted the concert.

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